Portland Therapy Blog

Local experts share the latest information and resources on all things mental health.

6 Things You Should Consider Before Cheating on Your Partner to Save Your Relationship.

Posted:   February 02, 2014 by Jeff Guenther, LPC

So you’re thinking about cheating on your partner? Maybe the honeymoon is over. Maybe you don’t have as much sex. Maybe you’ve been married for a while and it’s not as hot as you thought it would be. Maybe you met someone who is totally the opposite of your current partner and now you are questioning everything because you’re attracted to them. Maybe you’re just bored. There are tons of reasons for wanting to cheat and none of them are that original. I’ve heard them all.

Thoughts on Shame

Posted:   January 16, 2014 by Jay Cacka

I’ve been thinking a lot about shame lately. One difficult thing about shame is that it compounds on itself, similar to having to pay interest on a loan. And the interest rate is high. If you only make the minimum payment, it will take a long time to pay off and you will end up paying much more than the original cost. Shame says, “You’re not worthy of living a full life,” and it uses an array of scare tactics to keep you prisoner. Shame is like an infection of the psyche that perpetuates itself whenever it gets the chance.

Deal with Anger Before it Deals with You!

Posted:   December 23, 2013 by Keith Jackson

In order to conceptualize the dynamics of anger we must understand the emotion of anger. My contention is that with understanding comes awareness, and the more aware you are the more control you have.

Nature and Mental Health

Posted:   December 20, 2013 by Kirk Shepard

While Portland is known for its "green" policies and contentious urban planning, clients may still experience profound stress as childhood memories of landscapes, open fields, and less crowded neighborhoods are destroyed and replaced with modern construction.

Grief: How to be there for your partner

Posted:   November 26, 2013 by Jeff Guenther, LPC

Everyone deals with loss in a different way. Sometimes you go through the classic five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. But often we don’t go through all the stages in a linear fashion and sometimes we don’t go through some of the stages at all.