Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

I love using CBT interventions to support individuals to create change!

Thoughts aren't evidence; feelings are neither right or wrong; and behaviors can change how we think and feel. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is user friendly, evidenced-based and actually fun to practice. Best of all, by learning how to notice and engage only in productive thoughts, we create permanent physical changes in the brain that pave the way for healthier thought patterns in the future.

One of the foundations of CBT is looking at the interaction between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. When one is affected, the other two are also impacted. Emotions are difficult to control, but we can intervene on thoughts or behaviors to see change blossoming in the other two areas. Having more that one point of intervention can make looking at issues less intimidating and feel more solid.

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. \nCognitive behavioral therapy is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and with adults.

CBT is a highly structured therapy that is often completed in six to ten sessions. It utilizes homework, and seeks to bring awareness to types of thoughts we have, and the beliefs we hold that allow those thoughts to continue within us.

I utilize Cognitive Behavior Therapy as one of my main therapy modalities. If you change your thought patterns, you can change your mood, and it is evidence based to be successful

My year long internship required that we use CBT when working with our clients. I have had intense experience using this orientation and consulting with supervisors about this theory.

Much of my career has been working with individuals and groups from a cognitive behavioral perspective. There is a strong connection between our thoughts and beliefs, our emotional experiences, and the choices we make. Developing an understanding of that chain and the skills to influence it makes a significant difference in your quality of life.

CBT is a very practical approach to helping people gain power over the patterns of behavior that are getting in their way on a daily basis. A very useful tool for tackling anxiety and depressive symptoms.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is an extremely important tool for any therapist who wants to alleviate suffering. This is the foundation of much of my initial treatment for trauma, including STAIR to increase coping skills and Cognitive Processing Therapy to process some traumatic events. CBT helps me give my clients actual tools they can use to improve their life in measurable ways.

I learned about CBT in graduate school and use it both for myself and for my clients.

CBT focuses on awareness and reframing thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. It can help identify obstacles that prevent positive feelings about ourselves and those around us. Awareness is often the key to change. It is also a collaborative approach that give individual the power to create the change they seek.

I utilize Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for children ages 6-17 who have experienced a traumatic or stressful life event that has impacted their functioning. The 15-week course of therapy focuses on understanding and managing the triggers and symptoms of trauma, and emphasizes education, parent support, skill-building, and recovery from traumatic events.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered among the most rapid in terms of results obtained. What enables CBT to be briefer is its highly instructive nature and the fact that it makes use of homework assignments. CBT is time-limited in that we help clients understand at the very beginning of the therapy process that there will be a point when the formal therapy will end.

I am training in Trauma Focused CBT. I believe in deconstructing thinking errors as a means toward mental health. I do not adhere to a strictly CBT approach, but I do borrow heavily from the modality.

CBT training was an integral part of both my graduate education and internship. In my professional career, I regularly use CBT tools to address and challenge the often paralyzing hold that repetitive, relentless thought patterns have over us.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is widely accepted as an effective practice, and it involves looking at how our beliefs impact our emotions and behavior. I utilize CBT principles in our work as we compassionately trace old and unhelpful beliefs that may motivate our behaviors, attitudes and relationships.

CBT empowers people by increasing awareness of how thoughts and behavior affects how we feel. My training in CBT also includes Exposure with Response Prevention (ERP), which is an evidence-based treatment for anxiety.

CBT is a popular evidence-based therapy that focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In this therapy, you will learn how to evaluate and challenge thoughts that give rise to negative feelings and behaviors. You will also learn how to change problematic behaviors by gradually exposing yourself to triggering situations while practicing new coping strategies.

I received extensive training in this approach and have utilized this approach to effectively treat individuals with various issues and challenges.

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, is my secondary practice modality. I have extensive training in this model.

I work with clients to understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to make positive changes in their lives. This can be of especial help when clients feel that they are out of control and reacting rather than responding intentionally. It is also helpful for people who struggle with anxiety or depression.

My approach to counseling is modern and scientific and that is why I tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy in my sessions. I am able to provide you with many tools and techniques to deal with the problem in the here and now. Together we will influence your current way of thinking into something that feels more neutral or positive. There are many CBT interventions that I am able to employ.

Change your thoughts; change how you act.

Cognitive theories are often one of the most beneficial evidence based practices utilized in therapy. This approach allows you to explore thought processes that take us out of the moment and can often create stress and anxiety.

The connection between our thoughts/beliefs and our actions/choices cannot be under-estimated. Coming to recognize those and building new connections to more functional and effective thoughts/beliefs brings us to the place where better choices, actions, and outcomes can be made in our lives. Understanding where less functional thoughts/beliefs impact our lives is also important.

My education, CBT training, and extensive experience working with individuals, adolescents and families has given me the tools to help clients explore the complexities of past and present relationships, as well as maladaptive patterns, to find working solutions.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a research-supported treatment that focuses on altering patterns of thinking that amplify your distress. I incorporate elements of CBT therapy in to the treatment of many types of disorders and emotional experiences, including depression, trauma, anxiety, anger management, and self-esteem.

Cognitive Therapy is really useful in seeing the interconnectedness of thoughts, feelings and behavior. We can move from places of rigidity to more flexible and positively adaptive ways of thinking and responding in life.

We all have studied CBT extensively and approach our work with anxiety from a CBT perspective.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the connection and intersection between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors/actions. Our thoughts and how we think about ourself, others, and situations has a huge impact on how we feel and respond. CBT can help to identify and change old storylines (i.e. I'm never good enough, the world is a dangerous place) to improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety.

My graduate training focused on learning and practicing CBT with individuals and groups. I believe that thoughts, feelings, and actions are connected and influence one another. I use CBT to help identify and target specific thoughts, feelings, or behaviors that are problematic and work to disengage the cycle of negative influence then replace it with a more adaptive pattern.

Thoughts, feelings and behaviors are inter-related, so altering one can help alleviate problems in another. Cognitive behavioral therapy aims to help you identify, challenge, and modify unhelpful ideas or behavioral patterns. CBT also includes relaxation training and guidance for interpersonal relationships. I use CBT to help clients suffering from phobias, anxiety, panic, or depression.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) allows us to explore the connection between your feelings, thoughts, and behavior and also how they influence your day to day patterns and experiences. CBT provides us with skills to learn and work with to change these patterns into a different way of thinking and experiencing your emotions. This is especially helpful with teaching skills and personal growth.

Understanding what we do and how we think is so important regarding therapy, change, health, and healing. It is little wonder that CBT has been proven to be so highly effective in a wide variety of mental health issues. I have a basis of working from a CBT foundation.

I have extensive training in evidence-based approaches to therapy, especially cognitive and behavior therapy.

CBT is based on the recognition that our emotional life is intimately interconnected with our ways of perceiving, and our actions/behaviors. Bringing close attention to what we are thinking and doing sets the stage for freeing ourselves from conditioned patterns that aren't working. CBT offers a direct, 'rubber to the road' quality of actively trying out new ways seeing and doing.

CBT is the workhorse of therapy. Your thoughts effect your feelings, which propel you into action driving your behavior, which then informs your thoughts and feelings.... Shining a light on whats up with this process and even the core beliefs that lie under it is always a good \'tune up\'.

How we think about things affects our behaviors. How we behave affects how we think and what we believe. Too often our beliefs about ourselves or other people do what they do are distorted or incomplete. Challenging those beliefs opens up new ways of behaving and interacting with ourselves and the world.

My primary therapeutic orientation is cognitive behavioral therapy because I believe that our thinking can influence how we feel and how we behave. I have found this approach to be very successful in working with an array of problem areas including addictive denial, negative self-esteem, deflated thinking involved in depression, catastrophic thinking with anxiety, and relationship conflict.

My approach to therapy is called T.E.A.M. (testing, empathy, agenda setting, and methods). It was developed by Dr. David Burns from Stanford University. It is short-term therapy consisting of a variety of techniques selected based on each client's needs and circumstances. TEAM is unique in that therapy is driven by the client's agenda, not by a diagnosis or a prescribed course of intervention.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was a prominent approach in the 18 years of community mental health work I had the privilege to engage in. I was able to help clients formulate clear goals, develop applicable ways to practice useful techniques, and change thinking patterns that kept clients feeling stuck.

As we go through life we can develop thinking errors which can create patterns of behavior. By becoming aware, examining and replacing these thoughts we can decrease our emotional distress and self-defeating behavior. In order to effect long-lasting change, we have to change the internal messages and experience new behaviors.

Thoughts and feelings come and go, go ahead try to hold onto them, You cannot. Yet that is what we do when faulty thought patterns take us over. We want to know what they are, what to do, what feel and what to think. More often then not we let them tell us what to do. Reversing that course is the most sound method, Replacing them with up to date and accurate beliefs is the way through.

I am eclectic in my approach with a strong reliance on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I believe counseling is a process to provide insight and understanding in order to improve your life.

My graduate education was largely based in CBT. I find it a useful tool in getting started, before digging deeper. Many clients have discovered irrational beliefs that have, til now, shaped their world view. Examining these can be a huge step towards change.

Our thoughts and feelings drive our actions. If we can change a piece in that chain, we can get different results.

(CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach which addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors, cognitive processes, and contents through a number of goal-oriented, explicit systematic procedures.

A cognitive-behavioral approach understands that how we think affects how we feel and how we act. Many events, including trauma, can affect how we think about the world and ourselves and thus how we feel and how we cope. This approach can help you to feel better and choose safer, healthier coping mechanisms.

Understanding the relationship between thoughts and behavior is essential to creating behavior change and establishing positive thinking habits. CBT is an evidence-based practice and one I use with most clients.

My formal graduate training was in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In sessions we will often look at how your thoughts and behaviors interact with how you feel and then work to adjust the ways that you think and act. At times I send my clients home with formal tasks to try in between sessions so that they can integrate the session into their outside life.

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

I believe that sometimes using visuals, audios and other material will aid in helping one to change their thinking and then their behavior. With that said, you will be given tools, homework, in-session work, aides, etc to assist you in your life long changes.

As a class of interventions, CBT has received more empirical support than any other type of intervention - and this is precisely why our practice has a strong emphasis on CBT. We like to think of ourselves as cBt (i.e. little c, big B) in our implementation of CBT, meaning that we tend to emphasize cognitive change through experience, exposure, and skills building.

I have participated in several CBT trainings and continue to learn about and practice this treatment approach. I have found that it is very effective for most clients and have seen positive results.

I am results-oriented, practicing a wide range of therapeutic approaches with good success and achieve consistently good outcomes through regular outcome measures during the course of treatment. I have training and experience in Cognitive Analytic Therapy, Psychoanalytic Therapy, Clinical Hypnosis, Solution Focused Brief Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy...

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