Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

My primary therapeutic orientation is cognitive behavioral therapy because I believe that our thinking can influence how we feel and how we behave. I have found this approach to be very successful in working with an array of problem areas including addictive denial, negative self-esteem, deflated thinking involved in depression, catastrophic thinking with anxiety, and relationship conflict.

CBT is based on the idea that how we think strongly influences how we feel and behave. It assumes that we can change the way we think, feel and behave with practice. I enjoy implementing CBT into my practice and have found it very beneficial with the youth, families, and individuals I have been fortunate to work with.

One of the foundations of CBT is looking at the interaction between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. When one is affected, the other two are also impacted. Emotions are difficult to control, but we can intervene on thoughts or behaviors to see change blossoming in the other two areas. Having more that one point of intervention can make looking at issues less intimidating and feel more solid.

I regularly use cognitive behavioral techniques to help clients change their thought patterns.

I work with clients to manage their symptoms of anxiety and depression utilizing CBT strategies. This approach is practical, directive and hands on. We\'ll talk about how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are connected and how to effect positive change by \'doing\' differently. Also, in working with children, CBT is very effective in identifying areas for skills training and growth.

I have extensive formal training in using CBT to treat adults, children and families. I use this approach to therapy with clients who benefit from it in treating anxiety, depression, anger, and more.

My education, CBT training, and extensive experience working with individuals, adolescents and families has given me the tools to help clients explore the complexities of past and present relationships, as well as maladaptive patterns, to find working solutions.

Logically, thoughts influence emotions, and emotions influence behavior. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy embodies that logic.

I have extensive training in evidence-based approaches to therapy, especially cognitive and behavior therapy.

CBT helps clients understand their thoughts and feelings that influence their behavior. The goal of CBT is to teach clients that while they may not be able to control everything around them, they can take control of how they interpret and deal with things in their environment.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy assists the client in helping to change unhelpful thoughts into thoughts that are more beneficial, and often more accurate! CBT addresses those troublesome core beliefs about yourself, others, and the world around you. Often clients find that re-framing these thoughts by challenging them results in more rational thinking and doing.

My approach to therapy is called T.E.A.M. (testing, empathy, agenda setting, and methods). It was developed by Dr. David Burns from Stanford University. It is short-term therapy consisting of a variety of techniques selected based on each client's needs and circumstances. TEAM is unique in that therapy is driven by the client's agenda, not by a diagnosis or a prescribed course of intervention.

CBT is another evidence based treatment that focuses on thoughts, behaviors, and emotions. I call it \'brain training\' because it is focused on identifying, then re-framing, those negative thought patterns. CBT also adresses self defeating behaviors.

(CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach which addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors, cognitive processes, and contents through a number of goal-oriented, explicit systematic procedures.

I work with people to help them understand the connection between their thoughts, their feelings, and their actions so that they can notice what they are doing, and positive changes in their lives. This type of therapy is really useful for people with anxiety, depression, and trauma. Additionally, I often teach these skills to parents when their children have challenging behaviors.

During your session together we look for tasks that you can work accomplishing to slowly work through what you have identified as your current struggles. Then within 24 hours after your session I send you a individualized plan as a road map to help you continue to make ground on what you want to overcome.

CBT is the workhorse of therapy. Your thoughts effect your feelings, which propel you into action driving your behavior, which then informs your thoughts and feelings.... Shining a light on whats up with this process and even the core beliefs that lie under it is always a good \'tune up\'.

The change principles of CBT exist throughout all approaches to counseling. The key is knowing when and how to focus on our beliefs, self-talk, and the way we treat our own feelings. Sometimes it’s most helpful to pay close attention to the bricks and mortar of our minds – through mindfulness, problem-solving, journaling, and other activities – to begin to change embedded patterns.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy works strategically to help you identify your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and how they all interact to create your internal world.

I work with clients to understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to make positive changes in their lives. This can be of especial help when clients feel that they are out of control and reacting rather than responding intentionally. It is also helpful for people who struggle with anxiety or depression.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) allows us to explore the connection between your feelings, thoughts, and behavior and also how they influence your day to day patterns and experiences. CBT provides us with skills to learn and work with to change these patterns into a different way of thinking and experiencing your emotions. This is especially helpful with teaching skills and personal growth.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is an extremely important tool for any therapist who wants to alleviate suffering. This is the foundation of much of my initial treatment for trauma, including STAIR to increase coping skills and Cognitive Processing Therapy to process some traumatic events. CBT helps me give my clients actual tools they can use to improve their life in measurable ways.

CBT is a theory that has been empirically proven (a.k.a. it works!) to help with a variety of issues. I have used in in a variety of situations because of its versatility and effectiveness.

I\'ve been a CBT therapist for 12 years. I believe we unintentionally create our own misery in the way we interpret the world in childhood. We take those beliefs into adulthood and don\'t have the awareness to realize our original thinking may have been faulty. I work to identify the ways you view the world that cause pain instead of happiness and help you adapt healthier thinking patterns.

CBT is a very evidence-based approach to changing your behavior, thereby changing your thoughts. I rarely use CBT in isolation (I like to combine it with ACT) but CBT techniques are still my go-to approach for many common anxiety challenges.

CBT is a popular evidence-based therapy that focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In this therapy, you will learn how to evaluate and challenge thoughts that give rise to negative feelings and behaviors. You will also learn how to change problematic behaviors by gradually exposing yourself to triggering situations while practicing new coping strategies.

Change your thoughts; change how you act.

Cognitive theories are often one of the most beneficial evidence based practices utilized in therapy. This approach allows you to explore thought processes that take us out of the moment and can often create stress and anxiety.

I utilize Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for children ages 6-17 who have experienced a traumatic or stressful life event that has impacted their functioning. The 15-week course of therapy focuses on understanding and managing the triggers and symptoms of trauma, and emphasizes education, parent support, skill-building, and recovery from traumatic events.

I have over 30 hours of continuing education credit in CBT. I have facilitated groups and individual sessions using CBT curriculum. I have been practicing CBT counseling since the late 90s.

Our thoughts and feelings drive our actions. If we can change a piece in that chain, we can get different results.

We all have studied CBT extensively and approach our work with anxiety from a CBT perspective.

Our thinking impacts everything! Our sense of self. How we relate to the world. What we allow, and what we believe we deserve. Much of what we've learned, and continue to repeat to ourselves, actually isn't true. We want to make our mind an ally, not an adversary. As we develop a healthier relationship with our own mind, our stress reduces, our self-esteem grows and life becomes easier.

CBT is treatment focused on understanding problematic patterns of thinking that provoke certain problematic behaviors or reactions. A part of CBT treatment is working on skills, learned from sessions, out of session.

There is no question that thought and behaviors are connected. I can help clear the path of what is leading what and how to compartmentalize your thoughts.

CBT provides excellent tools to deal with anxiety, depression, OCD, and other road blocks. In a short period of time I can teach you relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, and how to refute negative thoughts that clutter your mind so that you can focus on what you truly are passionate about!

CBT is one of the most common practiced and evidenced-based therapies among psychotherapies. Following my master's level training in social work I underwent another two years of supervision utilizing this treatment. This therapy is scientific and teaches skills that can be generalized across life situations. This therapy is very powerful to bring desired change in one’s life.

training in CBT and helping people examine how thoughts influence actions and behaviors.

The connection between our thoughts/beliefs and our actions/choices cannot be under-estimated. Coming to recognize those and building new connections to more functional and effective thoughts/beliefs brings us to the place where better choices, actions, and outcomes can be made in our lives. Understanding where less functional thoughts/beliefs impact our lives is also important.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is one of the best ways to address depression and anxiety symptoms. It helps look at and shift some of the thoughts that can negatively impact how you feel and act. Sometimes our perceptions and thoughts about events or people or even life become so automatic that we aren\'t even sure what we are responding to anymore.

Much of my career has been working with individuals and groups from a cognitive behavioral perspective. There is a strong connection between our thoughts and beliefs, our emotional experiences, and the choices we make. Developing an understanding of that chain and the skills to influence it makes a significant difference in your quality of life.

CBT is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel. CBT works by changing people’s attitudes and behaviors by getting in touch with their thoughts, feelings, images, beliefs, and attitudes.

CBT is based on the premise that thoughts, behaviors and emotions are intertwined. When we attend to one of these aspects, change is affected across the others. My graduate training and current practice have consisted of assessment and intervention strategies rooted in this theory.

I have specific training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy from Portland State Universities Graduate School of Counseling. My experience includes the use of Cognitive Behavioral techniques with clients across various presenting issues.

I have received extensive training and supervision in CBT. I am an Approved Clinical Supervisor and train and supervise other clinicians in this modality.

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered among the most rapid in terms of results obtained. What enables CBT to be briefer is its highly instructive nature and the fact that it makes use of homework assignments. CBT is time-limited in that we help clients understand at the very beginning of the therapy process that there will be a point when the formal therapy will end.

CBT is based on the recognition that our emotional life is intimately interconnected with our ways of perceiving, and our actions/behaviors. Bringing close attention to what we are thinking and doing sets the stage for freeing ourselves from conditioned patterns that aren't working. CBT offers a direct, 'rubber to the road' quality of actively trying out new ways seeing and doing.

As we go through life we can develop thinking errors which can create patterns of behavior. By becoming aware, examining and replacing these thoughts we can decrease our emotional distress and self-defeating behavior. In order to effect long-lasting change, we have to change the internal messages and experience new behaviors.

CBT training was an integral part of both my graduate education and internship. In my professional career, I regularly use CBT tools to address and challenge the often paralyzing hold that repetitive, relentless thought patterns have over us.

With Cognitive Behavioral counseling one of the basic ideas I often talk to my clients about is the ABC's of emotions. A is the activating event, B is the way we interpret or evaluate the event, and C is the emotional consequence. We often jump from A to C so when we practice mindfulness and pausing, taking space, and slowing down we can learn to respond vs. react impulsively.

CBT is a evidence based intervention that I employ to assist individuals to identify distressing negative thought patterns along with creating peace around situations that they can not control. I will often couple the intervention of CBT with mindfulness to optimize this strategy.

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. \nCognitive behavioral therapy is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and with adults.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was a prominent approach in the 18 years of community mental health work I had the privilege to engage in. I was able to help clients formulate clear goals, develop applicable ways to practice useful techniques, and change thinking patterns that kept clients feeling stuck.

How we think about things affects our behaviors. How we behave affects how we think and what we believe. Too often our beliefs about ourselves or other people do what they do are distorted or incomplete. Challenging those beliefs opens up new ways of behaving and interacting with ourselves and the world.

Understanding what we do and how we think is so important regarding therapy, change, health, and healing. It is little wonder that CBT has been proven to be so highly effective in a wide variety of mental health issues. I have a basis of working from a CBT foundation.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a research-supported treatment that focuses on altering patterns of thinking that amplify your distress. I incorporate elements of CBT therapy in to the treatment of many types of disorders and emotional experiences, including depression, trauma, anxiety, anger management, and self-esteem.

I am eclectic in my approach with a strong reliance on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I believe counseling is a process to provide insight and understanding in order to improve your life.

We are not our thoughts and feelings and yet we often function as if we believe we are. CBT helps create some objectivity about our thoughts and feelings, as well as increase our capacity to challenge and change them thereby improving our mood and beliefs about ourselves. I like using an integrative approach that often incorporates CBT skills.

As a class of interventions, CBT has received more empirical support than any other type of intervention - and this is precisely why our practice has a strong emphasis on CBT. We like to think of ourselves as cBt (i.e. little c, big B) in our implementation of CBT, meaning that we tend to emphasize cognitive change through experience, exposure, and skills building.

CBT focuses on inner thoughts that drive behaviors. The process involves uncovering thoughts, examining what motivations might inspire them, and questioning whether they are still relevant to the current situation. CBT seeks to then change these thoughts. I diverge from CBT in that I don’t ask my clients to directly change thoughts. I encourage clients accept how thoughts might have been helpful.

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