Mindfulness-based

Mindfulness-based therapy is a therapeutic approach that focuses on, as the name suggests, the cultivation of mindfulness. There are a number of different therapeutic practices that fall under the category of mindfulness-based (or use components of mindfulness), including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), and Hakomi, among others. Mindfulness-based therapy is generally designed to help a client’s attention focus on the present moment and research has found it to be effective for many conditions, including anxiety, depression, stress and chronic pain.

Local Experts in Mindfulness-based

I am a meditation practitioner and a student of eastern wisdom traditions, and infuse principles of mindfulness into my work with clients. I have extensive experience utilizing elements of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) individually and in groups.

I am trained in Hakomi, an orientation that uses mindfulness to illuminate how you organize your experience and supports profound change to the core beliefs that limit your happiness. I have practiced mindfulness meditation for many years and believe that by strengthening our awareness of the present moment, we greatly enhance our capacity to enjoy the gifts of being human.

So many of us have busy minds and that interferes with living our lives the best we can. By using mindfulness techniques, we can become aware of what is happening in the moment and learn to stay out of the past and project into the future. This helps tremendously with depression, anxiety, and relationships.

Tuning in with the body and the wealth of information it has about your health and well being is difficult in our fast paced world but is fortunately gaining rapid attention. I use many mindfulness based techniques and exercises with clients to help ground them in their deepest self who knows how to withstand any situation.

Mindfulness involves the simple (and difficult) work of nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment--whatever thoughts, feelings, sensations, memories, or desires emerge in the present moment. My training and experience in integrating mindfulness into therapeutic work shows that awareness is the first step in moving towards change.

Mindfulness is the practice of becoming aware of our thoughts and feelings in the present moment. Mindfulness therapy focuses on developing the skill of not attaching ourselves to our thoughts and emotions. Mindfulness is also a component of DBT or Dialectical Behavior Therapy which focuses on emotional regulation and frustration tolerance. I am trained in using DBT techniques.

I have received extensive and unique training in contemplative psychotherapy from Naropa University. This goes beyond the typical mindfulness-based techniques and really is the foundation of the work I do as a counselor. My three year MA counseling psychology training emphasized bringing together the wisdom of Buddhist psychology and meditation with the wisdom and insight of western psychology.

We all practice fear of uncertainty and the future, and judgment of the present and past. Too much of it leads to frustration, anxiety, anger, and despair. I use mindfulness tools and practice to guide people in learning to accept their present, no matter how difficult or disappointing. It is then that they can feel open to the endless possibilities - and uncertainty - of the future.

Psychic suffering usually comes from people\'s discomfort with themselves -- their thoughts, moods, sensations, feelings, impulses, and actions. In Mindfulness-based therapy we create an environment which encourages curiosity and compassion, teaching you to observe and welcome what you are experiencing so you can develop presence and perspective rather than judging yourself or seeking escape.

I am a certified yoga instructor and have taught yoga and meditation for over a decade. I have a disciplined and regular personal yoga practice and have trained with Buddhist teachers.

Supporting greater life balance, sense of well-being and self-acceptance, mindfulness enhances the therapeutic process. Clients are encouraged to focus on thoughts, feelings and body in the moment without judgement.

Bringing mindfulness into one\'s life can lead to profound change. As a result, I aim to integrate mindfulness into my clinical work in a variety of ways. This intention is supported by two years of advanced professional training in Mindfulness & Behavior therapies. In addition to my professional experience, I maintain a personal meditation and yoga practice.

I have been a dedicated student of Zen Buddhism since 2002. My daily meditation practice has only changed my life for the better. I am also a student of Jon Kabat-Zinn, having participated in his week long training in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in 2008. Mindfulness is a potent way to soothe our own vulnerable feelings and reduce our suffering.

In addition to having a strong mindfulness/yoga based practice of my own for many years, I have been training with the META (Mindful Experiential Therapeutic Applications) clinic in Portland for over two years, focusing on the use of mind/body applications including Hakomi, the Re-Creation of the Self and adult attachment.

For the past 10 years, a major focus in my continued training has been in the arena of mindfulness techniques. I have also participated in consultation groups supporting the use of visualization, breath-work and body-awareness as effective therapeutic techniques. I have studied meditation techniques, containment skills and yoga philosophies that support mindfulness practices.

I use Focusing and somatic based techniques to help individuals experience, except and heal emotions in the body. I also use mindfulness as a way to get more centered and present, reducing anxiety and learning ways to get unhooked from unhelpful thoughts.

Mindfulness-based psychotherapy emphasizes present-centered awareness as a powerful resource and basis for healing and well-being. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression (MBCT-D) incorporate broadly applicableframeworks and skill-sets which inform my therapy practice.

Mindfulness theory encompasses a wide variety of techniques and skills. These processes allow for you to explore ways that have been used for centuries to create a calm mind and live in the present.

As humans living in a technological age, it is easy to become caught up in anxiety-provoking and unhealthy cycles of stress and excessive worry that ultimately lead us to a dead-end. Thus, I rely heavily on mindfulness-based practice in order to help individuals slow down their internal process and find joy and gratitude in moment-to-moment experiences.

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to our experience as it is happening in the moment. As we learn to pay attention to our experiences as they are happening, we are better able to notice our common reactions and responses and the subtleties that often otherwise go unnoticed. Therapy allows the special opportunity of slowing down and get connected to ourselves in mindful awareness.

Mindfulness involves attuning your attention to your immediate experience, without getting caught up in judgement. Practicing mindfulness allows you to live more fully in the present moment.

As with my Gestalt training, I have studied for over 5 years at the Gestalt Therapy Training Center NW in Portland. As well as years of self study and personal work.

My main approaches to therapy blend Eastern wisdom with Western science and include the use of mindfulness. I draw from Hakomi and RC-S (Re-Creation of the Self) approaches that allow us to uncover unconscious motivations for our behavior, hidden strengths we never knew we had, and cultivate a compassionate and non-judgmental attitude towards ourselves and others.\n\n

I value mindfulness as a part of daily life, and I have participated in many retreats and mindful practices. It was a perfect match when my clinical internship taught me the process of leading mindfulness for others, and integrating mindfulness as one of the primary DBT skills. Applying formal and informal mindfulness into daily life helps connect one with community, self, and feeling alive.

I have been a student of meditation and yoga for many years. Currently I am in a group of therapists who meet quarterly to explore meditation and therapy. I have studied Buddhist psychology and wrote my graduate thesis on the topic. When clients are interested, I incorporate mindfulness practice into my sessions.

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy is a modality that incorporates both fields of study, Eastern mindfulness (being aware in the present moment) and cognitive behavior therapy (understanding how your thoughts-emotions-behaviors affect you). By integrating both, you can increase your ability to cope with life events and/or change them if you wish.

Ruth practices mindfulness in clinical practice with children who have experienced trauma. Mindfulness is a practical way to learn how to tolerate stressful situations such as traumatic memories, intrusive thoughts, anxiety and fear.

Using mindfulness in therapy allows us to be still in the moment and examine a situation without attaching meaning to it. It encompasses topics like gratitude, meditation, relaxation, and being truly present to what\'s happening in the mind and body.

Mindfulness-based therapies are particularly helpful for anyone struggling with anxiety, chronic depression, and feelings of unhappiness. It helps us to learn how to identify our automatic thoughts without reacting to them in a way that is hurtful and to have a greater sense of mastery over our feelings which can often feel out of control.

'All the world is a stage.' You've certainly heard that before. But what if you were able to see your own life from the perspective of an audience member? You would certainly be impacted by what you were seeing, but you would be less likely to get swept into the drama. This is the essence of mindfulness-based therapy in a nutshell.

Mindfulness is a highly valuable tool and ability that promotes lasting change and instills happiness and thriving. I have seen how much benefit a mindfulness-based approach can have. I strive to incorporate \'mindfulness\' as well as \'balance\' as core concepts in my therapy work.

While on staff at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, I was a member of the Mindfulness & Behavior Therapies Team. My mindfulness-based therapy training includes DBT, ACT, MBCT, FAP, Yoga-Informed Psychotherapy, and Compassion-Based Therapies. I believe that mindful awareness gives us a starting point for learning new ways of being in the world.

I teach and use mindfulness when appropriate both in analysis and psychotherapy. I currently teach mindfulness at the Jung Institute in Zurich, CH.

\'Mindfulness\' as used in my training background means \'sustained, non-judgmental attention.\' This kind of mindfulness is not meditation; it is a therapeutic technique applied explicitly to promote insight and relieve distress. Mindful observation of one\'s feelings, sensations, and reactions, is a part of many therapy sessions, and may be done eyes-open or eyes-closed, as a client\'s comfort allows.

Being mindful can make it easier to savor the pleasures in life as they occur, help you become fully engaged in activities, and create a greater capacity to deal with adverse events. Many individuals report greater resiliency and deeper self-compassion.

Utiilzing various precepts of Buddhist psychology, mindfulness and somatic (body) based therapies, I am able to help people learn about what they are feeling,grown in their awareness and tolerance of their feeling states and move forward, even in discomfort. This allows my clients to be fully feeling while functioning in life\'s good and not-so-good moments of relating, working and adjusting.

According one of my favorite authors and experts in mental health, Daniel Siegel,'recent studies of mindfulness practices reveal that they can result in profound improvements in a range of physiological, mental, and interpersonal domains in our lives. ' I weave mindfulness into every therapeutic interaction as I believe it is the foundation for mental wellness.

Mindfulness practice advances self awareness and insight into how your emotions affect and often dis-regulate your body. Mindfulness is helpful by slowing down impulsive and reactionary behavior so that the person practicing these techniques can feel well grounded and in control of their emotions.

Mindfulness helps develop self-awareness by slowing down to experience how the body, emotions and mind feel. In relationship with the body, one can learn to feel safe, calm down the mind and shift emotions. In the presence of a skilled therapist, mindfulness can be used to heal, improve and change your life. I have studied mindfulness for 20 years, incorporating it in all aspects of therapy.

There is a lot of current research supporting the use of mindfulness techniques to control symptoms of depression, anxiety, ADHD and more. I often encourage clients to incorporate methods of mindfulness into their treatment.

I've practiced mindfulness meditation for over 20 yrs, and I understand the frustrations that are part of the process of learning to focus the mind. Mindfulness is not just a side part of my therapy practice, but a primary component that I use to connect the insight and awareness into one's motivation, and the development of empathy and compassion for oneself and others.

We can be mindful while washing the dishes. Paying attention to each dish, watching our scrubbing clear away the debris, and noticing our reaction to the work of washing is being MINDFUL. Next time you feel a feeling intensely try saying this to yourself, 'I'm noticing that I'm feeling _____, and I'm curious what's going on that I'm feeling this so intensely.' No judgement, just curious.

Mindfulness arises in the session naturally as we spend an hour looking deeply at what is happening here and now (even if it\'s thoughts and feelings about the past). In addition to cultivating mindfulness in session, we can also develop meditation skills (though meditation is helpful, it is not required).

Mindfulness is bringing our complete attention to the present moment. I believe that in order for change to occur we have to be aware. That can be an awareness of body pains, fears, thoughts, anything that is going on within ourselves. When we become aware, we are awake, we are conscious and therefore have choices rather than operating on sub-conscious patterns that repeat.

Mindfulness teaches how to be in the present moment with a non-judgmental and compassionate attitude.

I completed a 4 week mindfulness practice class by Kathleen Gleason MA at Portland Mindfulness Therapy Center and encourage my clients to routinely practice as well. Completing an online class entitled The Power of Mindfulness by Dr. Jack Kornfield has allowed me to see my clients and listen to their life stories with compassion and dignified respect.

Besides long experience as a meditator and yoga teacher, I have studied considerable research on the use of mindfulness-based methods to heal and improve typical counseling complaints, and understand how to use mindfulness to restore a sense of the richness of life to one\'s experience.

Paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment non-judgmentally with curiosity and compassion. Mindfulness can help us relax and focus. It can help us reset, reduce stress and bring about personal growth and healing.

I practice and been well trained in the art of mindfulness and how important this is for individuals working through trauma. Trauma lives within the body and talk therapy isn't enough thus why this skills is essential when working with abuse of any sort.

Mindfulness helps change more rapidly occur, spotting unhelpful thoughts and behaviors and readjusting them. Research shows when you slow down and more purposefully notice the present (instead of worrying over the past or future), you are able to lessen emotional distress, angry or anxious reactivity, and instead act more adaptively with mental flexibility, improving relationship satisfaction.

Mindfulness-based psychotherapy is a process that engages the powerful and transformational tool of being aware of the present moment. It allows us to see clearly what is happening in our mind and heart, offering the opportunity for greater choice and the ability to create positive change. As the breath regulates the nervous system, attention toward stillness creates space for deep healing.

In counseling we will use various accessible mindfulness techniques. These will resource us for the work and will also serve as tools as we explore experiences of the mind and body.

I base my mindfulness approach on my own contemplative practice since 1975, John Kabat-Zinn, and Thich Nhat Hanh\'s works.

Kick the hamster wheel

I am deeply passionate about mindfulness based ways of coping with suffering. Developing this approach has been central in my professional and personal growth for over a decade. It is possible to transform the way our mind works. Reconnecting with the present moment, developing the ability to notice what the mind is doing, and improving our capacity to accept the uncontrollable can be powerful.

Much of my approach stems from mindfulness - slowing down, connecting with the present, and noticing your thoughts and feelings without judgement. The first step in the process of change is awareness, and mindfulness is an incredibly useful tool in this. I've taken an 8-week training course on Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction, and have seen much change in clients when using this approach.

My experience with mindfulness stems from professional training in mindfulness based approaches such as ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) and many years of personal mindfulness and meditation practice.

I am Certified by the UMass Medical School's Center for Mindfulness (the birthplace of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction). This represents many years of training, as well as supervised practice. I am also trained to teach MBCT, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. I maintain a rigorous meditation and mindfulness practice of my own, and love to share these life-saving skills.

I utilize a range of mindfulness techniques, such as guided visualizations, various breathing techniques, reflective journaling, present moment sensory exploration and other body based techniques.

I have studied mindfulness-based meditative traditions of various cultures experientially all over the world. I draw from these experiences, as well as three years training with the M.E.T.A. Institute here in Portland, to create a state of mind that allows us to explore your selfhood without judgment and with greater curiosity.

Mindfulness has been a successful way of life for thousands of years. Based on Eastern traditions it is a non-theistic philosophy, grounded in our core values and beliefs. Practicing mindfulness improves attention, focus, effectiveness, tolerance, acceptance, and compassion.

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