Immigration/Acculturation

The U.S. immigrant population faces a unique set of challenges. Every experience is different and there can be a number of factors that impede or facilitate your adjustment in your new home. You may have experienced trauma on your journey or in your country of origin that can have a lasting effect on your health and happiness. Or perhaps you are having trouble connecting with your new community or are worried about the recent growing controversy about immigration policies. Whatever your experience, a qualified mental health professional can help you understand how immigration is impacting your life and provide you with useful tools for your challenges.

Local Experts in Immigration/Acculturation

I lived in Japan for 17 years as a teacher, wife and mother. I became fluent in the language, and as a graduate student in clinical psychology became interested in the ways people learn a new language and culture. I have worked with Japanese patients in Japanese, and in English with individuals and couples struggling with acculturation and international marriage.

Words like 'home', 'culture', and 'mother tongue' can feel especially complex and confusing to those whose roots have been uprooted. No matter how recently or remotely one emigrated, was adopted at birth, or is a second generation immigrant, the process of belonging is always underway. As a transnational person my self, I can support you and your relationships navigate the rich soil you inhabit.

An estimated 50 percent of expatriates and immigrants experience mental health issues. Factors contributing to this experience are separation from one’s home culture, isolation from support, language barriers, and a mainstream culture hostile to immigrants. I am Polish-Canadian and an imigrant to the US myself. Counseling with someone who understands the immigrant experience can alleviate stressors.

I have lived experience as an immigrant and a person of color, as well as professional experience working with people facing challenges of acculturation and adjustment. I especially enjoy working w/ parents and offer both individual and family therapy. I also hope to offer a support group in the near future.

Drawing from my experience and identity as a Mexican American person, I understand the nuanced experience of code switching and managing family and social dynamics that come with being bicultural and bilingual (Spanish/English) in a mainstream dominant culture. Immigration issues create additional barriers that affect familial and social interactions.

As an immigrant to the U.S. myself, I have had a lifelong experience of acculturation. Changing one\'s culture, or attempting to fit it into another touches each aspect of one\'s life. In doing so, it can rock your identity as a whole. Please consider setting up a consultation appointment, to receive some professional support on this journey.

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