Hakomi

Founded by Ron Kurtz in the 1970’s, Hakomi is a body-centered method of therapy that incorporates Eastern philosophies, Western scientific sources and spiritual practices. The Hakomi Method is focused on seven core principles: mindfulness, nonviolence, organicity, unity, mind/body holism, truth and change. Always keeping these principles top of mind, Hakomi therapists follow a recommended general method, with the goal of helping clients to change their core beliefs and encouraging self-exploration and personal growth.

Local Experts in Hakomi

Hakomi is an approach to therapy that brings mindful attention to bodily experiences, and an experiment-based approach to insight and change. I have extensive training in Hakomi and tend to use some of its techniques in most of my sessions. I borrow from Hakomi an attitude of compassionate respect for each client's organic process, and a basic stance of seeking to follow and unfold that process.

I use Hakomi to help my clients access the wisdom of the body in the present moment, and to overcome their obstacles in a nonviolent way that respects the organicity of who they are. I have interned at the M.E.T.A. Counseling Clinic and began training in Hakomi in 2010.

I trained in Hakomi through M.E.T.A., which is also where I completed a year-long internship utilizing this Experiential, Somatic, and Mindful process of therapy.

I have been training and immersing in Hakomi for almost four years with the local M.E.T.A. training center. It is a core part of my practice.

Hakomi is a body-centered psychotherapy based in mindfulness that believes that change happens through accessing the interface between our mind and body. Using this method we can uncover core beliefs and psychological patterns and revive the body’s knowledge as a resource. Increasing our awareness and enabling emotional release at this deep level of ourselves, change becomes attainable.

A mindfulness-based form of psychodynamic therapy.

Hakomi is a nonviolent, collaborative, mindful process, providing and allowing multiple ways to map your internal experience, change core beliefs, and integrate conflicting parts of self.

I completed the Hakomi Mindful Experiential Psychotherapy Module at the M.E.T.A Training Center and practiced for a year under the supervision of Donna Roy, LPC, CHT, using this model of therapy. Hakomi is grounded in the principles of Unity, Organicity, Mind/Body/Spirit Holism, Mindfulness, Non-violence, Truth, and Change. https://meta-trainings.com/hakomi-mindful-somatic-psychotherapy/

Hakomi is a somatic/ body-based approach that helps people heal their \'core\' material, either from childhood wounds or other influential events that shape how we see the world today. It is experiential, meaning the focus is more on experience in the moment than analyzing the past.

I have been training and serving as a TA at the Portland META (Mindful Experiential Therapy Approaches) Institute since 2015. My training there includes Hakomi Mindful Somatic Psychotherapy, Experiential Attachment Psychotherapy, and Advanced Clinical Maps.

My approach is grounded in Hakomi Body-Centered Psychotherapy. Hakomi is a gentle and deeply effective approach to therapy that uses mindfulness as a key tool for self-discovery and healing.

Hakomi uses mindfulness to go towards your “core material,” or deeply ingrained beliefs about yourself and the world. By uncovering and examining these beliefs, we aim to discard inaccurate beliefs that no longer serve you, and gain new, life affirming experiences that help you understand the truth of yourself and the world, thereby living in alignment with each.

I incorporate mindfulness-based methods of Hakomi, Recreation of Self (RC-S), attachment work, and trauma resourcing. I have extensive training learning these modalities through my internship experience and training with Mindful Experiential Therapy Approaches (M.E.T.A.).

Hakomi is a body-centered, mindfulness-based approach. Hakomi uses body awareness to access the unconscious. Both trauma and brilliant, creative healing wisdom are stored in the body. By learning how to listen to and follow your body\'s cues, you will find a depth , ease and aliveness that working in ordinary consciousness can\'t access.

I completed the Hakomi training through the META institute in Portland, OR, where I continue to receive training and one-on-one mentoring in the method. I also took a couples training with Gal Szekely, a Hakomi instructor out of San Francisco, whose speciality is working with multicultural couples.

← Back to Terms List