Self-Harming

Self-harm is the act of intentionally hurting your own body. Skin-cutting or burning are the most common types of self-harm. Self-harm generally occurs when a person faces painful emotions that seem overwhelming or experiences intense feelings of self-hatred. By physically injuring themselves, a person who self-harms feels in control and is able to temporarily relieve their intense emotions. The release provided by self-harm passes quickly, replaced by feelings of guilt and shame. In children and teenagers, self-harm is sometimes a cry for help or attention. Although self-harm is not usually a suicide attempt, it is a very unhealthy and dangerous way of coping with feelings of anger, frustration or emotional pain. Seeing a mental health professional can help individuals who self-harm to find positive and healthy ways to cope with negative feelings and put an end to their destructive behavior.

Local experts in Self-Harming

Arrival Counseling annie dolle LCSW (she/her/hers)

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

LCSW

Working in Level 1 Trauma Emergency Dept I have significant experience working to assess and support individuals in acute pain and crisis. I know this serves a purpose and I want to know more. I also use EMDR and experiential therapy to heal the deeper wounds that are managed through any form of self harming behaviors.

View Profile
Firefly Institute

Licensed Professional Counselor

Whether a person has recently started hurting his or herself or has been doing it for a while, there is an opportunity to improve health and find a new path for managing complex emotions or life experiences. Firefly provides individual, family and group counseling to address self-harming behaviors. We also offer an intensive outpatient program for those who need increased care and support.

View Profile
Sara Fuller (She/Her/Hers)

Licensed Professional Counselor

LPC, CCATP-CA

When uncomfortable emotions flood the nervous system it can feel scary and overwhelming resulting in intense physical sensations or numbness. Non-Suicidal Self Harm is often a faulty skill used to take control of that scary, overwhelming experience. We work together to find healthier methods of control while building tolerance to the discomfort of emotions and stronger connection between the mind and body.

View Profile
Kate Keating (she/her)

Licensed Professional Counselor

MA, LPC

Self-harm was a common reason students came to see me in my work as a school counselor. I have researched this issue extensively and have advanced training from the Portland DBT institute.

View Profile