Attachment Theory

Attachment theory was first developed by psychologist John Bowlby and focuses on the importance of early emotional bonds. Attachment theory investigates the nature of a person’s initial relationship with their primary caregiver (such as a parent) and how it influences their social and emotional development. Therapists using attachment theory can help a client to identify their individual attachment style. Attachment styles influences how individuals relate to each other in intimate relationships. Knowing your attachment style can be a powerful tool in understanding your strengths and weaknesses in a relationship.

Local Experts in Attachment Theory

My Masters in Clinician Mental Health and ongoing post-Masters intensive trainings feature a fundamental understanding of how our childhood attachment relationships profoundly shape our sense of self, others and the world. I am currently participating in an 18 month training intensive that focuses primarily on supporting clients to repair and transform their childhood attachment wounds.

A thorough grasp of attachment theory is foundational to understand most forms of dysregulation or mental illness. I consider attachment patterns as I seek to tune in to each client\'s suffering. I also have training in attachment-based therapeutic techniques.

Attachment theory is a key tenant of my work, particularly with it\'s current support from neurobiology, which demonstrates the importance of mindfulness in mental health. I have attended many trainings with Daniel Seigel, MD and I stay current with the literature as it evolves.

Issues related to how we form attachments with others, and difficulties in relationships

Attachment theory is all about love and safety. How we experience that from an early age influences the coping skills we develop for all of our relationships, especially during times of conflict and struggle. I love that we can change how we feel about ourselves, our relationships and the world at large through the context of new, safe, reparative experiences.

Whether you find your attachment tendencies to be secure, ambivalent-insecure, avoidant-insecure, or even disorganized, working with attachment concerns in counseling can cultivate amazing results. Healthy attachment in our relationships leads to all kinds of proactive and prosocial behavior throughout the lifespan. You were made to be in secure relationships, I believe it's your birthright.

Attachment explores early stages of life and one's relationships to our caretakers. Attachment affects us even today. Early attachment interruption often causes depression, anxiety, other issues. Jungian Analysts are trained in Attachment Theory and able to work sensitively and capably with the legacy of these early situations.

Our relationship with our selves and others begins with our experience of attachment to our caregivers. Attachment is a huge influential part of our behaviors in relationship with everyone in our lives- our partners, children, parents, families, and friends.

Attachment theory is a way of getting to the heart of how you grew up, why you do what you do, and how your relating to others is affecting your relationships. I have seen the way people really build insight into what's going on and I can say from experience, it's amazing!

Humans learn attachment from their primary caregivers. This relationship we have with our parents directly reflects our relationships with our friends, other family members, co-workers, and intimate partners. I work with clients to identify their attachment, and how it can help or hinder their personal success in creating and maintaining relationships.

Attachment and schema driven therapy were cornerstones of my graduate education program. I believe that the attachment, or lack there of, to our primary caregivers plays an integral part in shaping who we are and how confident and capable we feel. \nI have many years of experience working with individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder, which I see as a disorder rooted in attachment trauma.

Attachment theory, developed by John Bowlby, explains the way humans connect and develop safe interpersonal relationships. This theory proposes that children learn to attach to adults who are senstive and responsive to their needs from birth. Parents are used as a secure base to explore outside relationships safely and these early interactions are used as a future template for connection.

I believe deeply in the power of human connection and how it shapes us. Our earliest significant relationships heavily influence how we learn to see ourselves and relate to others and the world. These dynamics evolve over our adult lives. It can be tremendously helpful to look at these histories and patterns to learn about ourselves and make change from a deeper place of self-understanding.

Attachment work in therapy explores how dysfunctional attachment templates get represented in adult relationships by clients developing a personal, healthy, therapeutic relationship with their counselor. This relationship lays the groundwork to understand clients’ attachments to others through consistent and supportive communication.

Attachment theory provides an explanation of how early relationships continue to emerge and impact our present day lives and current relationships. Understanding how family of origin can be especially meaningful in creating insight and compassion, giving clients life altering awareness and new found coping skills.

I have researched and trained in various attachment-based theories related to parenting, adoption, couples and families.

Attachment therapy uses principles of modern neuroscience and research about the ways humans form inner relationship models based on our early relationships. Unless they are interrupted, we carry these forward into current relationships, for better or for worse. I work with a client\'s present moment relational experiences to unravel old relationship patterns and foster new, more satisfying ones.

Attachment theory is a theory of affect regulation and interpersonal relationships. Adult attachment anxiety is conceptualized as the fear of interpersonal rejection and abandonment, negative view of the self or feelings of increased anxiety or depression within relationships. Children can experience insecurity within their relationships and the behaviors we see are a result of that anxiety.

I have and continue to participate in graduate education and professional development that focuses on attachment and attachment related trauma. I continue to participate in graduate classes through Portland State University\'s Trauma Informed Services and Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) programs and participate in an advanced study group focusing on trauma, attachment, and IPNB.

Attachment theory helps us untangle the complex web of early learning that can make engaging in fulfilling adult relationships difficult and painful. I hold special training in a method called Experiential Attachment, which naturally elicits the infant/caregiver attachment system, allowing for examination of early attachment wounding and engagement in a process of repair.

As with systems theory, I find attachment theory to be an extremely helpful model in supporting clients. We are indelibly marked by our early bonds with caregivers and typically, what we learned in those relationships sets our beliefs about the world and determines the patterns we follow in future relationships. Not that we can't change, attachment theory just helps us understand why.

Using a perspective that adult issues can stem from attachment patterns of early childhood informs the treatment methods I use.

Attachment is all about how we live in the context of a symbiotic relationship with the world around us. We are at our best when we can mutually recognize and help to meet the needs of our loves ones and community, and they ours.

Our early childhood attachments with our caregivers creates a template for how we respond and relate with ourselves, and our relationships. They inform our beliefs about the world and from this, we internalize relational patterns. We can cultivate understanding of why we attached the way we did and how we can utilize neuro-plasticity to create new templates to get our emotional needs met.

Patterns of thought and ways of being in relationships with others are largely put in place prior to acquiring the ability to verbalize our experience. As such much of what we know and how we know it are implicit. Nonetheless these embedded patterns can effectively addressed by counseling in an atmosphere of empathic collaborative dialogue.

I have years of experience working directly with families to assess attachment-related concerns, as well as providing Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) and Attachment Regulation and Competency (ARC) work. When I conduct psychological evaluations, I consider the attachment with the primary caregiver as an important source of resiliency.

An individual\'s attachment patterns with early significant persons in their life contributes to present and future connections with others. Identifying and understanding these patterns can help individuals develop more freeing ways of engaging with others and themselves now and in the future.

Each of us has an attachment style and this style can change throughout our lives. From the moment we are born factors contribute to our attachment. As a marriage, couple and family therapist I investigate the numerous factors and help identify an attachment style.

I believe our attachments to our first caregivers offer us a window into how we feel and function in our current relationships and life endeavors. Using narrative and discussion to understand the complex web of attachment-based emotions and experience in the world, I can help you feel empowered and in charge of your life choices and behaviors.

Our earliest relationships form the templates for how we interact and what we expect from others. These patterns live in our body and in the ways that we engage with (or avoid) others. Over the past 10 years, I have learned how to recognize and work with individual attachment styles and relationship patterns through my in-depth studies with Bonnie Badenoch, PhD, LMFT.

I help individuals and couples create safe, stable, and intimate relationships where each partner learns to trust and rely on their partner and themselves to meet their deepest wants and needs. You'll also learn how to identify your own and your partner's triggers and use this knowledge to prevent fights and repair the damage when things go awry.

I have used Attachment, Regulation and Competency model often in my work. Using this theory, I work with clients to enhance caregiving and attachment, build skills to help children and adults respond well to their internal experience and increase resiliency. Through this technique we can work together to empower you or your child.

We all want to feel connected, we just don't always know how. I draw heavily from attachment theory as well as training with the M.E.T.A. Institute in attachment focused techniques to bring this knowledge into our work. Profound life changes can take place when we face our fears of vulnerability and connection in a safe and supportive relationship.

Through the study of Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) we have a great new understanding of the restorability of wholeness where emotional damage was done from unresponsive, unconscious, or even violent caretakers. Our work is in the relationship, as the \'interpersonal\' actually enables a new neurologic wiring as well as new realizations of worthiness and value.

I have received significant training in Attachment Theory and Practice at what is now the Portland Psychoanalytic Center. My significant training and experience in Child Development informs this work.

I have advanced training and experience working with attachment theory, including a study group with Beatrice Beebe, a leading researcher in this area.

Secure attachment requires a solid base, safety to explore and return to that base. Within the body and mind, we may feel that people cannot be trusted, will betray or abandon us, or even hurt us. Fortunately, we can re-build a secure attachment by exploring these very real fears and finding stable, safe people to bond with.

The tone of our early relationships with caregivers sets the stage for how we relate to others and how we experience the world around us throughout our lives. Attending to attachment styles in therapy helps heal old wounds and helps you feel better in your relationships. I trained in attachment-oriented couples and individual therapy both in graduate school and post-grad.

Our earliest relationships help construct a map for how we expect future relationships to unfold. Our sense of safety--both internal and shared--has its roots in how we were parented. All of this is changeable, as our brains grow and change for our whole lives; the greatest factor of influence is how and with whom we connect. That's attachment: Getting our needs met, in a dance with others.

Learning to understand our early attachment experiences and how they shaped our current relationship dynamics.

My theoretical focus is through the lens of attachment – that is, how the bonds we create are effective, or ineffective, in our current lives (John Bowlby). In addition to attachment bonds that we experience, I also support my clients collaboratively to better understand life’s stressors and patterns of interaction that may or may not be promoting his or her well-being.

The way in which we try to connect with others informs not only how we interact with others, but also a lot of things about the world and our own identity. I find that using this theory can help clients better understand their motivations and how to get what they need from life in better and more productive ways.

It is during our early development that our ways of understanding relationship are being mapped into our brains. Attachment therapy can awaken these networks for reconfiguration. Deep change is possible in how we experience ourselves, in our ways of connecting with others and in our capacity to act effectively in the world.

Attachment Theory is an extraordinarily helpful tool to understand how we developed our baseline relational styles. By studying our earliest emotional attachments to our primary caregiver(s), we can understand how we developed our sense of trust, security, and self-assuredness in relationship to others. Knowing your attachment style can become a navigational compass in relationships.

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