Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

My graduate training focused on learning and practicing CBT with individuals and groups. I believe that thoughts, feelings, and actions are connected and influence one another. I use CBT to help identify and target specific thoughts, feelings, or behaviors that are problematic and work to disengage the cycle of negative influence then replace it with a more adaptive pattern.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was a prominent approach in the 18 years of community mental health work I had the privilege to engage in. I was able to help clients formulate clear goals, develop applicable ways to practice useful techniques, and change thinking patterns that kept clients feeling stuck.

Stacie is a Certified Cognitive Behavioral Therapist

Understanding the relationship between thoughts and behavior is essential to creating behavior change and establishing positive thinking habits. CBT is an evidence-based practice and one I use with most clients.

CBT is based on the recognition that our emotional life is intimately interconnected with our ways of perceiving, and our actions/behaviors. Bringing close attention to what we are thinking and doing sets the stage for freeing ourselves from conditioned patterns that aren't working. CBT offers a direct, 'rubber to the road' quality of actively trying out new ways seeing and doing.

CBT focuses on the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. In CBT, the client and therapist identify distorted thought patterns and explore alternative explanations. There is typically homework assigned to monitor and document thoughts. CBT is useful for a variety of disorders, including anxiety and depression.

The connection between our thoughts/beliefs and our actions/choices cannot be under-estimated. Coming to recognize those and building new connections to more functional and effective thoughts/beliefs brings us to the place where better choices, actions, and outcomes can be made in our lives. Understanding where less functional thoughts/beliefs impact our lives is also important.

Thoughts aren't evidence; feelings are neither right or wrong; and behaviors can change how we think and feel. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is user friendly, evidenced-based and actually fun to practice. Best of all, by learning how to notice and engage only in productive thoughts, we create permanent physical changes in the brain that pave the way for healthier thought patterns in the future.

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

During your session together we look for tasks that you can work accomplishing to slowly work through what you have identified as your current struggles. Then within 24 hours after your session I send you a individualized plan as a road map to help you continue to make ground on what you want to overcome.

By talking through your thoughts, feelings, and concerns, they have a way of seeming smaller and more manageable. CBT is a way of helping you identify and challenge thoughts that are unhelpful or untrue and tend to cause unwanted feelings and behavior.

I work with people to help them understand the connection between their thoughts, their feelings, and their actions so that they can notice what they are doing, and positive changes in their lives. This type of therapy is really useful for people with anxiety, depression, and trauma. Additionally, I often teach these skills to parents when their children have challenging behaviors.

(CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach which addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors, cognitive processes, and contents through a number of goal-oriented, explicit systematic procedures.

CBT is a popular evidence-based therapy that focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In this therapy, you will learn how to evaluate and challenge thoughts that give rise to negative feelings and behaviors. You will also learn how to change problematic behaviors by gradually exposing yourself to triggering situations while practicing new coping strategies.

I utilize Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for children ages 6-17 who have experienced a traumatic or stressful life event that has impacted their functioning. The 15-week course of therapy focuses on understanding and managing the triggers and symptoms of trauma, and emphasizes education, parent support, skill-building, and recovery from traumatic events.

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. \nCognitive behavioral therapy is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and with adults.

Thoughts, feelings and behaviors are inter-related, so altering one can help alleviate problems in another. Cognitive behavioral therapy aims to help you identify, challenge, and modify unhelpful ideas or behavioral patterns. CBT also includes relaxation training and guidance for interpersonal relationships. I use CBT to help clients suffering from phobias, anxiety, panic, or depression.

The human capacity for language allows us to solve problem abstractly in our heads. This can be a blessing or a curse. Because of this capacity, we can actually think our way into misery. Becoming more aware of how we tend to do this and learning new internal 'scripts' can impact our ability to enjoy life.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the connection and intersection between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors/actions. Our thoughts and how we think about ourself, others, and situations has a huge impact on how we feel and respond. CBT can help to identify and change old storylines (i.e. I'm never good enough, the world is a dangerous place) to improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety.

I have extensive training in evidence-based approaches to therapy, especially cognitive and behavior therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy assists the client in helping to change unhelpful thoughts into thoughts that are more beneficial, and often more accurate! CBT addresses those troublesome core beliefs about yourself, others, and the world around you. Often clients find that re-framing these thoughts by challenging them results in more rational thinking and doing.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is widely accepted as an effective practice, and it involves looking at how our beliefs impact our emotions and behavior. I utilize CBT principles in our work as we compassionately trace old and unhelpful beliefs that may motivate our behaviors, attitudes and relationships.

Although my approach is eclectic I have a strong reliance on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. CBT helps us understand the relationship between our thoughts, feelings and behavior

Logically, thoughts influence emotions, and emotions influence behavior. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy embodies that logic.

I have extensive formal training in using CBT to treat adults, children and families. I use this approach to therapy with clients who benefit from it in treating anxiety, depression, anger, and more.

CBT is a very evidence-based approach to changing your behavior, thereby changing your thoughts. I rarely use CBT in isolation (I like to combine it with ACT) but CBT techniques are still my go-to approach for many common anxiety challenges.

We are not our thoughts and feelings and yet we often function as if we believe we are. CBT helps create some objectivity about our thoughts and feelings, as well as increase our capacity to challenge and change them thereby improving our mood and beliefs about ourselves. I like using an integrative approach that often incorporates CBT skills.

My graduate education was largely based in CBT. I find it a useful tool in getting started, before digging deeper.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) allows us to explore the connection between your feelings, thoughts, and behavior and also how they influence your day to day patterns and experiences. CBT provides us with skills to learn and work with to change these patterns into a different way of thinking and experiencing your emotions. This is especially helpful with teaching skills and personal growth.

I work with clients to understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to make positive changes in their lives. This can be of especial help when clients feel that they are out of control and reacting rather than responding intentionally. It is also helpful for people who struggle with anxiety or depression.

There is no question that thought and behaviors are connected. I can help clear the path of what is leading what and how to compartmentalize your thoughts.

As a class of interventions, CBT has received more empirical support than any other type of intervention - and this is precisely why our practice has a strong emphasis on CBT. We like to think of ourselves as cBt (i.e. little c, big B) in our implementation of CBT, meaning that we tend to emphasize cognitive change through experience, exposure, and skills building.

I learned about CBT in graduate school and use it both for myself and for my clients.

With Cognitive Behavioral counseling one of the basic ideas I often talk to my clients about is the ABC's of emotions. A is the activating event, B is the way we interpret or evaluate the event, and C is the emotional consequence. We often jump from A to C so when we practice mindfulness and pausing, taking space, and slowing down we can learn to respond vs. react impulsively.

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, is my secondary practice modality. I have extensive training in this model.

I work with clients to manage their symptoms of anxiety and depression utilizing CBT strategies. This approach is practical, directive and hands on. We\'ll talk about how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are connected and how to effect positive change by \'doing\' differently. Also, in working with children, CBT is very effective in identifying areas for skills training and growth.

I utilize cognitive-behavioral therapy methods with almost all of my clients. I have discovered that profound therapeutic change often occurs for those who not only accept and make peace with their internal experience but also create practical solutions in their daily lives through behavioral and cognitive change.

I\'ve been a CBT therapist for 12 years. I believe we unintentionally create our own misery in the way we interpret the world in childhood. We take those beliefs into adulthood and don\'t have the awareness to realize our original thinking may have been faulty. I work to identify the ways you view the world that cause pain instead of happiness and help you adapt healthier thinking patterns.

CBT provides excellent tools to deal with anxiety, depression, OCD, and other road blocks. In a short period of time I can teach you relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, and how to refute negative thoughts that clutter your mind so that you can focus on what you truly are passionate about!

My approach to counseling is modern and scientific and that is why I tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy in my sessions. I am able to provide you with many tools and techniques to deal with the problem in the here and now. Together we will influence your current way of thinking into something that feels more neutral or positive. There are many CBT interventions that I am able to employ.

I have over 30 hours of continuing education credit in CBT. I have facilitated groups and individual sessions using CBT curriculum. I have been practicing CBT counseling since the late 90s.

CBT empowers people by increasing awareness of how thoughts and behavior affects how we feel. My training in CBT also includes Exposure with Response Prevention (ERP), which is an evidence-based treatment for anxiety.

Primarily my cognitive-behavioral interventions, include exposure with response prevention, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, social skills training, and stress management. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the most widely researched and evidence-based form of goal oriented therapy; CBT is significantly helpful for depression, anxiety, ocd and acute stress.

As we go through life we can develop thinking errors which can create patterns of behavior. By becoming aware, examining and replacing these thoughts we can decrease our emotional distress and self-defeating behavior. In order to effect long-lasting change, we have to change the internal messages and experience new behaviors.

Cognitive Therapy is really useful in seeing the interconnectedness of thoughts, feelings and behavior. We can move from places of rigidity to more flexible and positively adaptive ways of thinking and responding in life.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is one of the best ways to address depression and anxiety symptoms. It helps look at and shift some of the thoughts that can negatively impact how you feel and act. Sometimes our perceptions and thoughts about events or people or even life become so automatic that we aren\'t even sure what we are responding to anymore.

CBT is treatment focused on understanding problematic patterns of thinking that provoke certain problematic behaviors or reactions. A part of CBT treatment is working on skills, learned from sessions, out of session.

My education, CBT training, and extensive experience working with individuals, adolescents and families has given me the tools to help clients explore the complexities of past and present relationships, as well as maladaptive patterns, to find working solutions.

I have received extensive training and supervision in CBT. I am an Approved Clinical Supervisor and train and supervise other clinicians in this modality.

I have been trained through my graduate school education and over 50 hours in CEUs on CBT methods for treating anxiety and depression. I believe strongly in the CBT tenant of the connection between thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

My graduate education was largely based in CBT. I find it a useful tool in getting started, before digging deeper. Many clients have discovered irrational beliefs that have, til now, shaped their world view. Examining these can be a huge step towards change.

Cognitive theories are often one of the most beneficial evidence based practices utilized in therapy. This approach allows you to explore thought processes that take us out of the moment and can often create stress and anxiety.

I received training in my graduate program on CBT and continued to study this model independently following graduation. I use CBT as the primary treatment modality for clients with anxiety, depression and negative thought patterns.

Our thoughts and feelings drive our actions. If we can change a piece in that chain, we can get different results.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a research-supported treatment that focuses on altering patterns of thinking that amplify your distress. I incorporate elements of CBT therapy in to the treatment of many types of disorders and emotional experiences, including depression, trauma, anxiety, anger management, and self-esteem.

The change principles of CBT exist throughout all approaches to counseling. The key is knowing when and how to focus on our beliefs, self-talk, and the way we treat our own feelings. Sometimes it’s most helpful to pay close attention to the bricks and mortar of our minds – through mindfulness, problem-solving, journaling, and other activities – to begin to change embedded patterns.

Thoughts and feelings come and go, go ahead try to hold onto them, You cannot. Yet that is what we do when faulty thought patterns take us over. We want to know what they are, what to do, what feel and what to think. More often then not we let them tell us what to do. Reversing that course is the most sound method, Replacing them with up to date and accurate beliefs is the way through.

Change your thoughts; change how you act.

← Back to Terms List