Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

Cognitive Therapy is really useful in seeing the interconnectedness of thoughts, feelings and behavior. We can move from places of rigidity to more flexible and positively adaptive ways of thinking and responding in life.

I focused much of my study as an undergraduate and a graduate student learning the practice of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. My professional supervision and development has been centered around developing my skills as a cognitive behavioral therapist, and integrating it with expressive arts work.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was a prominent approach in the 18 years of community mental health work I had the privilege to engage in. I was able to help clients formulate clear goals, develop applicable ways to practice useful techniques, and change thinking patterns that kept clients feeling stuck.

Understanding how we think impacts our behaviors and emotions. Reframing those thoughts can influence our experience with others and the world.

I have been incorporating methods and skills of CBT in my practice for more than 12 years. I have completed related formal education and related conferences and workshops.

Throughout my education and in follow-up trainings, the foundation of CBT has been an important part of how I approach specific strategies for changing and restructuring thought and behavioral patterns that contribute to distress and unhappiness. Together, we utilize this approach to evaluate the interconnected relationship of your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors to make positive changes.

I regularly use cognitive behavioral techniques to help clients change their thought patterns.

My longstanding practice involves exploring how our thoughts, feelings, actions and behaviors effect each other every day. In our work we identify thinking errors that can harm us in our work to resolve conflicts in our relations and within self esteem challenges. I am also certified in Brene' Brown's work which involves exploring our thought processes and how they can hinder us.

My graduate training focused on learning and practicing CBT with individuals and groups. I believe that thoughts, feelings, and actions are connected and influence one another. I use CBT to help identify and target specific thoughts, feelings, or behaviors that are problematic and work to disengage the cycle of negative influence then replace it with a more adaptive pattern.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can help you identify the connection between your thoughts, feelings and behaviors to help you better challenge negative thought patterns and create healthier thoughts and actions to combat anxiety and depression.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps us to identify common thinking, behavioral and emotional patterns that we may have learned through life experience, but no longer serve us well. It encourages us to challenge our unrealistic (ie, distorted) thought patterns, and change self-defeating behaviors, to achieve greater emotional wellbeing. This therapy can complement mindfulness and somatic therapies.

I use CBT tools and theories to help clients with their thoughts and thought patterns. CBT is the the leading evidence-based approach in helping multitude of issues and mental health disorders.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the connection and intersection between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors/actions. Our thoughts and how we think about ourself, others, and situations has a huge impact on how we feel and respond. CBT can help to identify and change old storylines (i.e. I'm never good enough, the world is a dangerous place) to improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety.

I utilize Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for children ages 6-17 who have experienced a traumatic or stressful life event that has impacted their functioning. The 15-week course of therapy focuses on understanding and managing the triggers and symptoms of trauma, and emphasizes education, parent support, skill-building, and recovery from traumatic events.

CBT is a highly structured therapy that is often completed in six to ten sessions. It utilizes homework, and seeks to bring awareness to types of thoughts we have, and the beliefs we hold that allow those thoughts to continue within us.

You may be seeking therapy because you are struggling with the way you are feeling or acting. These patterns are often influenced by inaccurate or negative ways you are thinking about yourself or interpreting situations with others. I use CBT to illuminate these patterns and help you change them.

Primarily my cognitive-behavioral interventions, include exposure with response prevention, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, social skills training, and stress management. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the most widely researched and evidence-based form of goal oriented therapy; CBT is significantly helpful for depression, anxiety, ocd and acute stress.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is one of the best ways to address depression and anxiety symptoms. It helps look at and shift some of the thoughts that can negatively impact how you feel and act. Sometimes our perceptions and thoughts about events or people or even life become so automatic that we aren\'t even sure what we are responding to anymore.

The science behind psychotherapy is clear: cognitive behavioral therapy is the treatment of choice for many conditions, including depression and anxiety. My training is in this treatment model and I have implemented it in my practice for over 20 years.

CBT helps individuals identify and change errors in their thinking and consequently their behavior.

I utilize a cognitive behavioral framework to help you identify and challenge cognitive distortions and barriers getting in the way of reaching your goals.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy assists the client in helping to change unhelpful thoughts into thoughts that are more beneficial, and often more accurate! CBT addresses those troublesome core beliefs about yourself, others, and the world around you. Often clients find that re-framing these thoughts by challenging them results in more rational thinking and doing.

CBT is based on the idea that how we think strongly influences how we feel and behave. It assumes that we can change the way we think, feel and behave with practice. I enjoy implementing CBT into my practice and have found it very beneficial with the youth, families, and individuals I have been fortunate to work with.

My original training at Oberlin College\'s Psychology Department and my Masters of Social Work curriculum at Arizona State University both focused primarily on Cognitive-Behavioral skills in therapy.

CBT is treatment focused on understanding problematic patterns of thinking that provoke certain problematic behaviors or reactions. A part of CBT treatment is working on skills, learned from sessions, out of session.

Looking at core beliefs, why they are what they are and learning to question them are ways in which change can happen.

CBT is a popular evidence-based therapy that focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In this therapy, you will learn how to evaluate and challenge thoughts that give rise to negative feelings and behaviors. You will also learn how to change problematic behaviors by gradually exposing yourself to triggering situations while practicing new coping strategies.

CACREP accredited education and experience with clients utilizing CBT.

CBT is a collaborative and goal-oriented treatment that focuses on teaching practical skills that stick. When applied to adult ADHD, CBT can help patients manage distractibility, plan, prioritize, monitor time, solve problems, and get things done. Helping patients maintain motivation and challenge negative thinking patterns is often an important piece of treatment, too.

Understanding what we do and how we think is so important regarding therapy, change, health, and healing. It is little wonder that CBT has been proven to be so highly effective in a wide variety of mental health issues. I have a basis of working from a CBT foundation.

The human capacity for language allows us to solve problem abstractly in our heads. This can be a blessing or a curse. Because of this capacity, we can actually think our way into misery. Becoming more aware of how we tend to do this and learning new internal 'scripts' can impact our ability to enjoy life.

I work with clients to understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to make positive changes in their lives. This can be of especial help when clients feel that they are out of control and reacting rather than responding intentionally. It is also helpful for people who struggle with anxiety or depression.

I love using CBT interventions to support individuals to create change!

I have been trained in providing CBT for various disorders for children, teens, and adults for over 10 years.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy works strategically to help you identify your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and how they all interact to create your internal world. I use CBT in tandem with exposure and response prevention (ERP) for folks dealing with symptoms related to OCD, panic, PTSD, or anxiety.

My primary therapeutic orientation is cognitive behavioral therapy because I believe that our thinking can influence how we feel and how we behave. I have found this approach to be very successful in working with an array of problem areas including addictive denial, negative self-esteem, deflated thinking involved in depression, catastrophic thinking with anxiety, and relationship conflict.

I utilize CBT to help clients reframe unhealthy thinking and identify thoughts/beliefs that are interfering with life goals. It is habit to rationalize our reasons for staying the same and/or not having the ability to change. This can be resolved by addressing our thoughts and beliefs and aligning our thinking towards our life goals.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a treatment designed to increase our awareness of how our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors interact. CBT is skills based, providing you with tools to shift your thinking and your actions to improve the quality of your life and help you feel better.

I have received extensive training and supervision in CBT. I am an Approved Clinical Supervisor and train and supervise other clinicians in this modality.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy teaches us to mindfully acknowledge our responses to the external world. If we can begin to recognize how we think, feel and behave, or, operate we can make small changes to develop healthier patterns.

I have been trained through my graduate school education and over 50 hours in CEUs on CBT methods for treating anxiety and depression. I believe strongly in the CBT tenant of the connection between thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

I work with people to help them understand the connection between their thoughts, their feelings, and their actions so that they can notice what they are doing, and positive changes in their lives. This type of therapy is really useful for people with anxiety, depression, and trauma. Additionally, I often teach these skills to parents when their children have challenging behaviors.

CBT is a well-researched, evidence based theory, which, is one reason I choose to integrate this theory into my practice with clients. I also incorporate CBT because I believe it is important to collaborate with clients in the therapeutic process, challenge cognitive distortions and irrational beliefs, and be intentional making healthy, lasting changes.

I work with clients to manage their symptoms of anxiety and depression utilizing CBT strategies. This approach is practical, directive and hands on. We\'ll talk about how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are connected and how to effect positive change by \'doing\' differently. Also, in working with children, CBT is very effective in identifying areas for skills training and growth.

I use an eclectic variety of techniques under this method to help you recognize patterns in your thinking, feelings, and behavioral choices that can be altered in order to live a more joy filled life.

I don't like these labels and have nothing to add.

Have had two and a half decades of training and practice using this orientation

Knowledgeable and gifted in a way that assists individuals in acknowledging their attitude, behaviors, and beliefs by focusing on how these processes relate to the way they behave and interact with the world and assist them in taking a more positive stand to improve their mental health.

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