Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

As we go through life we can develop thinking errors which can create patterns of behavior. By becoming aware, examining and replacing these thoughts we can decrease our emotional distress and self-defeating behavior. In order to effect long-lasting change, we have to change the internal messages and experience new behaviors.

CBT views our behavior as fundamentally influenced by our thoughts and emotions. CBT allows us to better understand these maladaptive or \'dysfunctional\' thoughts and replace them with those that have a more positive influence over our behaviors. While we certainly cannot control everything and everyone around us, our thoughts and feelings are aspects of our lives that we can gain control over.

We all have studied CBT extensively and approach our work with anxiety from a CBT perspective.

CBT helps you look at unhelpful thoughts and their effect on your mood and behaviors.

CBT targets negative thinking patterns and how these thoughts lead to low self-esteem or negative self-talk. The goal of CBT is to replace these negative thoughts will positive affirmations, intern creating positive outcomes. It is what I like to refer to as the “self-fulfilling prophesy” form of therapy.

My graduate education was largely based in CBT. I find it a useful tool in getting started, before digging deeper.

Understanding how your thoughts directly effect your feelings and behavior is the first step in changing how you feel and behave. When my client become aware and use skills to change their thinking is it rewarding to witness the changes in their lives.

Throughout my education and in follow-up trainings, the foundation of CBT has been an important part of how I approach specific strategies for changing and restructuring thought and behavioral patterns that contribute to distress and unhappiness. Together, we utilize this approach to evaluate the interconnected relationship of your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors to make positive changes.

I utilize cognitive-behavioral therapy methods with almost all of my clients. I have discovered that profound therapeutic change often occurs for those who not only accept and make peace with their internal experience but also create practical solutions in their daily lives through behavioral and cognitive change.

I have participated in several CBT trainings and continue to learn about and practice this treatment approach. I have found that it is very effective for most clients and have seen positive results.

CBT is a popular evidence-based therapy that focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In this therapy, you will learn how to evaluate and challenge thoughts that give rise to negative feelings and behaviors. You will also learn how to change problematic behaviors by gradually exposing yourself to triggering situations while practicing new coping strategies.

CBT empowers people by increasing awareness of how thoughts and behavior affects how we feel. My training in CBT also includes Exposure with Response Prevention (ERP), which is an evidence-based treatment for anxiety.

How we think about things affects our behaviors. How we behave affects how we think and what we believe. Too often our beliefs about ourselves or other people do what they do are distorted or incomplete. Challenging those beliefs opens up new ways of behaving and interacting with ourselves and the world.

I am training in Trauma Focused CBT. I believe in deconstructing thinking errors as a means toward mental health. I do not adhere to a strictly CBT approach, but I do borrow heavily from the modality.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is one of the best ways to address depression and anxiety symptoms. It helps look at and shift some of the thoughts that can negatively impact how you feel and act. Sometimes our perceptions and thoughts about events or people or even life become so automatic that we aren\'t even sure what we are responding to anymore.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy teaches us to mindfully acknowledge our responses to the external world. If we can begin to recognize how we think, feel and behave, or, operate we can make small changes to develop healthier patterns.

Have had two and a half decades of training and practice using this orientation

Earned certification in advance use of CBT for depression and anxiety.

I am eclectic in my approach with a strong reliance on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I believe counseling is a process to provide insight and understanding in order to improve your life.

CBT is a theory that has been empirically proven (a.k.a. it works!) to help with a variety of issues. I have used in in a variety of situations because of its versatility and effectiveness.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy assists the client in helping to change unhelpful thoughts into thoughts that are more beneficial, and often more accurate! CBT addresses those troublesome core beliefs about yourself, others, and the world around you. Often clients find that re-framing these thoughts by challenging them results in more rational thinking and doing.

I completed advanced training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with the Beck Institute. Techniques include addressing automatic thoughts, core beliefs and cognitions, and, developing a plan for change. The goal is to develop new ways of engaging that improve how you feel.

I love using CBT interventions to support individuals to create change!

I focused much of my study as an undergraduate and a graduate student learning the practice of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. My professional supervision and development has been centered around developing my skills as a cognitive behavioral therapist, and integrating it with expressive arts work.

I have specific training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy from Portland State Universities Graduate School of Counseling. My experience includes the use of Cognitive Behavioral techniques with clients across various presenting issues.

CBT is treatment focused on understanding problematic patterns of thinking that provoke certain problematic behaviors or reactions. A part of CBT treatment is working on skills, learned from sessions, out of session.

12 year experience using CBT techniques learned in grad school and in trainings.

Ruth's holds extensive training and supervision in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy by experts at Columbia University who helped develop and test this approach after the attacks on 9/11. Ruth has practiced TF-CBT with children and families since 2010 and has seen positive results with her clients. She utilizes this treatment as her primary speciality in private practice.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was a prominent approach in the 18 years of community mental health work I had the privilege to engage in. I was able to help clients formulate clear goals, develop applicable ways to practice useful techniques, and change thinking patterns that kept clients feeling stuck.

Experienced with several CBT treatments including Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Processing Therapy (trauma processing), and Prolonged Exposure ( trauma processing)

I regularly use cognitive behavioral techniques to help clients change their thought patterns.

My formal graduate training was in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In sessions we will often look at how your thoughts and behaviors interact with how you feel and then work to adjust the ways that you think and act. At times I send my clients home with formal tasks to try in between sessions so that they can integrate the session into their outside life.

Logically, thoughts influence emotions, and emotions influence behavior. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy embodies that logic.

CBT is an evidenced-based form of therapy that can help you change your thoughts, behaviors, and emotions resulting in a better quality of life. CBT ultimately teaches you to be your own therapist by learning applicable skills to apply in your daily life.

CBT is a evidence based intervention that I employ to assist individuals to identify distressing negative thought patterns along with creating peace around situations that they can not control. I will often couple the intervention of CBT with mindfulness to optimize this strategy.

I use the empirically evidenced skills and techniques of CBT in an integrative format in my work: rather than teaching my clients to use the homework or techniques to \'fix\' problems, I urge them to learn skills (from CBT) to augment overall healing/progress. I use CBT thoughtfully and mindfully in my work.

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. \nCognitive behavioral therapy is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and with adults.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the connection and intersection between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors/actions. Our thoughts and how we think about ourself, others, and situations has a huge impact on how we feel and respond. CBT can help to identify and change old storylines (i.e. I'm never good enough, the world is a dangerous place) to improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety.

Using an established evidence-based method, I help you gently identify and challenge the barriers getting in the way of reaching your goals. I am engaged but compassionate and insightful and enjoy viewing issues from various angles to help clients understand themselves more deeply and most importantly to empower them to take meaningful action toward authentic change and fulfillment.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) allows us to explore the connection between your feelings, thoughts, and behavior and also how they influence your day to day patterns and experiences. CBT provides us with skills to learn and work with to change these patterns into a different way of thinking and experiencing your emotions. This is especially helpful with teaching skills and personal growth.

training in CBT and helping people examine how thoughts influence actions and behaviors.

I\'ve been a CBT therapist for 12 years. I believe we unintentionally create our own misery in the way we interpret the world in childhood. We take those beliefs into adulthood and don\'t have the awareness to realize our original thinking may have been faulty. I work to identify the ways you view the world that cause pain instead of happiness and help you adapt healthier thinking patterns.

There is no question that thought and behaviors are connected. I can help clear the path of what is leading what and how to compartmentalize your thoughts.

We are not our thoughts and feelings and yet we often function as if we believe we are. CBT helps create some objectivity about our thoughts and feelings, as well as increase our capacity to challenge and change them thereby improving our mood and beliefs about ourselves. I like using an integrative approach that often incorporates CBT skills.

Thoughts, emotions, and behaviors are all inter-connected. In making alterations to your perspective, you will also be able to change how you feel and change habitual behavior. Through identification of core beliefs, challenging thinking errors, and use of chain analysis, I help clients make changes in their life.

I use an eclectic variety of techniques under this method to help you recognize patterns in your thinking, feelings, and behavioral choices that can be altered in order to live a more joy filled life.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking.

I believe that sometimes using visuals, audios and other material will aid in helping one to change their thinking and then their behavior. With that said, you will be given tools, homework, in-session work, aides, etc to assist you in your life long changes.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered among the most rapid in terms of results obtained. What enables CBT to be briefer is its highly instructive nature and the fact that it makes use of homework assignments. CBT is time-limited in that we help clients understand at the very beginning of the therapy process that there will be a point when the formal therapy will end.

CBT focuses on awareness and reframing thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. It can help identify obstacles that prevent positive feelings about ourselves and those around us. Awareness is often the key to change. It is also a collaborative approach that give individual the power to create the change they seek.

I believe in the relationship of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and have experience in identifying and challenging various aspects of these interrelated concepts to help you transition toward a more peaceful life.

The connection between our thoughts/beliefs and our actions/choices cannot be under-estimated. Coming to recognize those and building new connections to more functional and effective thoughts/beliefs brings us to the place where better choices, actions, and outcomes can be made in our lives. Understanding where less functional thoughts/beliefs impact our lives is also important.

I don't like these labels and have nothing to add.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective approach to helping individuals gain insight into the patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that are causing them to feel stuck. Through therapy, I will support you in recognizing distorted thought patterns and explore alternative explanations.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common type of talk therapy (psychotherapy). One works with a mental health counselor in a structured way, attending a limited number of sessions. CBT helps one become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking so they can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way.

I work with clients to understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to make positive changes in their lives. This can be of especial help when clients feel that they are out of control and reacting rather than responding intentionally. It is also helpful for people who struggle with anxiety or depression.

I work with clients to manage their symptoms of anxiety and depression utilizing CBT strategies. This approach is practical, directive and hands on. We\'ll talk about how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are connected and how to effect positive change by \'doing\' differently. Also, in working with children, CBT is very effective in identifying areas for skills training and growth.

CBT is one of the most common practiced and evidenced-based therapies among psychotherapies. Following my master's level training in social work I underwent another two years of supervision utilizing this treatment. This therapy is scientific and teaches skills that can be generalized across life situations. This therapy is very powerful to bring desired change in one’s life.

CBT focuses on inner thoughts that drive behaviors. The process involves uncovering thoughts, examining what motivations might inspire them, and questioning whether they are still relevant to the current situation. CBT seeks to then change these thoughts. I diverge from CBT in that I don’t ask my clients to directly change thoughts. I encourage clients accept how thoughts might have been helpful.

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