Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used in the treatment of many mental disorders (including anxiety and depression), but can also be helpful for anyone who would benefit from learning how to manage life’s stressful situations in healthier ways.

Local Experts in Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Thoughts and feelings come and go, go ahead try to hold onto them, You cannot. Yet that is what we do when faulty thought patterns take us over. We want to know what they are, what to do, what feel and what to think. More often then not we let them tell us what to do. Reversing that course is the most sound method, Replacing them with up to date and accurate beliefs is the way through.

CBT is based on the recognition that our emotional life is intimately interconnected with our ways of perceiving, and our actions/behaviors. Bringing close attention to what we are thinking and doing sets the stage for freeing ourselves from conditioned patterns that aren't working. CBT offers a direct, 'rubber to the road' quality of actively trying out new ways seeing and doing.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a research-supported treatment that focuses on altering patterns of thinking that amplify your distress. I incorporate elements of CBT therapy in to the treatment of many types of disorders and emotional experiences, including depression, trauma, anxiety, anger management, and self-esteem.

CBT views our behavior as fundamentally influenced by our thoughts and emotions. CBT allows us to better understand these maladaptive or \'dysfunctional\' thoughts and replace them with those that have a more positive influence over our behaviors. While we certainly cannot control everything and everyone around us, our thoughts and feelings are aspects of our lives that we can gain control over.

Change your thoughts; change how you act.

I use CBT and mindfulness as tools to help challenge beliefs that underline habitual suffering and implement tools that empower the client to make more conscious and congruent choices in relationships and life.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of treatment that centers around investigating the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. CBT is based on the idea that a person's mood is directly related to his or her thought patterns and is intended to help clients to recognize negative or inaccurate thoughts and replace them with healthier, more productive ways of thinking.

While the current vogue is to combine cognitive and behavioral therapies into one school of thought, I see them as two fundamentally different techniques that work powerfully together. Cognitive therapy helps us modify our reactions by reexamining our fundamental assumptions. And behavioral modification is a way of tracking and rebuilding the activities that make up our lives.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered among the most rapid in terms of results obtained. What enables CBT to be briefer is its highly instructive nature and the fact that it makes use of homework assignments. CBT is time-limited in that we help clients understand at the very beginning of the therapy process that there will be a point when the formal therapy will end.

Using the insight garnered from our personal work, CBT offers the tools to restructure our thought patterns, modify our emotional responses, and create practical solutions to adapt new healthy behaviors and patterns that lead to successful mental health outcomes.

I use cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help people recognize the relation between their thoughts, feelings, actions, and behaviors. This reliable method is versatile, and is easily adapted to address different issues and accommodate different viewpoints.

My formal graduate training was in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In sessions we will often look at how your thoughts and behaviors interact with how you feel and then work to adjust the ways that you think and act. At times I send my clients home with formal tasks to try in between sessions so that they can integrate the session into their outside life.

I received extensive training in this approach and have utilized this approach to effectively treat individuals with various issues and challenges.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the connection and intersection between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors/actions. Our thoughts and how we think about ourself, others, and situations has a huge impact on how we feel and respond. CBT can help to identify and change old storylines (i.e. I'm never good enough, the world is a dangerous place) to improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety.

CBT is an evidenced-based form of therapy that can help you change your thoughts, behaviors, and emotions resulting in a better quality of life.

CBT focuses on inner thoughts that drive behaviors. The process involves uncovering thoughts, examining what motivations might inspire them, and questioning whether they are still relevant to the current situation. CBT seeks to then change these thoughts. I diverge from CBT in that I don’t ask my clients to directly change thoughts. I encourage clients accept how thoughts might have been helpful.

I work from a cognitive behavioral model to challenge unhelpful patterns and create new ways of coping with the challenges you are facing.

We are not our thoughts and feelings and yet we often function as if we believe we are. CBT helps create some objectivity about our thoughts and feelings, as well as increase our capacity to challenge and change them thereby improving our mood and beliefs about ourselves. I like using an integrative approach that often incorporates CBT skills.

Much of my career has been working with individuals and groups from a cognitive behavioral perspective. There is a strong connection between our thoughts and beliefs, our emotional experiences, and the choices we make. Developing an understanding of that chain and the skills to influence it makes a significant difference in your quality of life.

Our thinking impacts everything! Our sense of self. How we relate to the world. What we allow, and what we believe we deserve. Much of what we've learned, and continue to repeat to ourselves, actually isn't true. We want to make our mind an ally, not an adversary. As we develop a healthier relationship with our own mind, our stress reduces, our self-esteem grows and life becomes easier.

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, is my secondary practice modality. I have extensive training in this model.

I specialize in utilizing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to help us understand how our thoughts, feelings, and behavior impact each other and work towards changing thought patterns. My training also includes utilizing Exposure and Response Prevention treatment primarily to help those experiencing Anxiety and/or OCD.

I believe that sometimes using visuals, audios and other material will aid in helping one to change their thinking and then their behavior. With that said, you will be given tools, homework, in-session work, aides, etc to assist you in your life long changes.

My approach to counseling is modern and scientific and that is why I tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy in my sessions. I am able to provide you with many tools and techniques to deal with the problem in the here and now. Together we will influence your current way of thinking into something that feels more neutral or positive. There are many CBT interventions that I am able to employ.

I love using CBT interventions to support individuals to create change!

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is widely accepted as an effective practice, and it involves looking at how our beliefs impact our emotions and behavior. I utilize CBT principles in our work as we compassionately trace old and unhelpful beliefs that may motivate our behaviors, attitudes and relationships.

I believe in the relationship of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and have experience in identifying and challenging various aspects of these interrelated concepts to help you transition toward a more peaceful life.

There are specific steps you can take to find Food Freedom! I will show you the steps and help you take them. This is the key to addressing the underlying issues and having a trusting relationship with food and with yourself.

I completed advanced training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with the Beck Institute. Techniques include addressing automatic thoughts, core beliefs and cognitions, and, developing a plan for change. The goal is to develop new ways of engaging that improve how you feel.

I use CBT tools and theories to help clients with their thoughts and thought patterns; CBT can be especially helpful in eating disorder/body image or anxiety related thoughts. CBT is the the leading evidence-based approach in helping numerous struggles and mental health disorders.

CBT is based on the idea that how we think strongly influences how we feel and behave. It assumes that we can change the way we think, feel and behave with practice. I enjoy implementing CBT into my practice and have found it very beneficial with the youth, families, and individuals I have been fortunate to work with.

I utilize cognitive-behavioral therapy methods with almost all of my clients. I have discovered that profound therapeutic change often occurs for those who not only accept and make peace with their internal experience but also create practical solutions in their daily lives through behavioral and cognitive change.

Cognitive Therapy is really useful in seeing the interconnectedness of thoughts, feelings and behavior. We can move from places of rigidity to more flexible and positively adaptive ways of thinking and responding in life.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is one of the best ways to address depression and anxiety symptoms. It helps look at and shift some of the thoughts that can negatively impact how you feel and act. Sometimes our perceptions and thoughts about events or people or even life become so automatic that we aren\'t even sure what we are responding to anymore.

I utilize Cognitive Behavior Therapy as one of my main therapy modalities. If you change your thought patterns, you can change your mood, and it is evidence based to be successful

My original training at Oberlin College\'s Psychology Department and my Masters of Social Work curriculum at Arizona State University both focused primarily on Cognitive-Behavioral skills in therapy.

CBT is simple, very effective and can be difficult. When we realize that attached to every thought is a belief about ourselves and the world that may not even be our own, we begin our work on re-building a belief system that is effective and satisfying for us.

I have been trained in providing CBT for various disorders for children, teens, and adults for over 10 years.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is based in the belief that our beliefs and self talk regarding events in our life are the cause of our distress. Creating ways of disrupting the automatic patterns that lead us down paths of dysfunction such as thought correcting exercises and mindfulness practices are key to creating our recovery.

Although my approach is eclectic I have a strong reliance on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. CBT helps us understand the relationship between our thoughts, feelings and behavior

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) allows us to explore the connection between your feelings, thoughts, and behavior and also how they influence your day to day patterns and experiences. CBT provides us with skills to learn and work with to change these patterns into a different way of thinking and experiencing your emotions. This is especially helpful with teaching skills and personal growth.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy assists the client in helping to change unhelpful thoughts into thoughts that are more beneficial, and often more accurate! CBT addresses those troublesome core beliefs about yourself, others, and the world around you. Often clients find that re-framing these thoughts by challenging them results in more rational thinking and doing.

CBT helps clients understand their thoughts and feelings that influence their behavior. The goal of CBT is to teach clients that while they may not be able to control everything around them, they can take control of how they interpret and deal with things in their environment.

CBT helps individuals identify and change errors in their thinking and consequently their behavior.

My graduate education was largely based in CBT. I find it a useful tool in getting started, before digging deeper.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy is probably my go to therapy I use with clients. I like setting goals and working towards those goals. I do believe that if we can change our thought process about most things we can change our emotions and actions.

I have extensive formal training in using CBT to treat adults, children and families. I use this approach to therapy with clients who benefit from it in treating anxiety, depression, anger, and more.

CBT is focused on helping clients deal with a very specific problem. In my experience, I have helped clients work through issues with their anxiety, anger, depression, emotional roadblocks relating to career transitions or relationship issues.

Using the theory of how thoughts, feelings and behaviors influence one another, we can explore how this is impacting your life. Many people with triggers for their maladaptive behaviors, find CBT to be useful in understanding how those behaviors are influenced by past experiences, emotions, automatic thoughts, etc. Working together, we can learn about how to change behavioral responses to stimuli.

CBT involves identifying and changing the maladaptive patterns in your thoughts and behaviors that are keeping problems stuck in place.

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